1. iOS Programming with Lua

    Matthew Burke, Bluedino Software In this article I will discuss three methods for using Lua to build iOS apps. The techniques range from using Lua to build the entire application (Corona) to using Lua as a component for scripting your application (do it yourself or Wax). Before getting into the details, there are two main questions to answer: Why use Lua? Will Apple let you use Lua? The answers to these questions are intertwined.

    Continue reading

    Published on 23 September 2010 by Mathew Burke

  2. Setting Orbit to use Apache2

    This article will cover how to install Lua Orbit on an Ubuntu 8.04+ server. This will explain how to setup Apache2 and Xavante on the server. This allows for production code to run through Apache2 and then develop using Xavante. To hook Orbit to Apache2 we will be using FastCGI for the best performance. NOTE: This is just one way to configure your server to run Orbit applications; it does require that you have root access.

    Continue reading

    Published on 8 September 2010 by Ryan Pusztai

  3. Authentication-based permission groups in Sputnik

    Sputnik is a novel document-storage-based wiki written in Lua which has been previously featured on LuaNova. Today I’d like to share my experiences adding authentication-based permission groups to my running Sputnik installation at wowprogramming.com. Over the course of the past two months I have had two spam posts on our forums which were fixed by removing those nodes from the document store, but this left me with a question of what to do with the user account that posted the spam message.

    Continue reading

    Published on 19 May 2010 by Jim Whitehead

  4. Porting Lua to RISC OS

    RISC OS is euphemistically called a minority operating system. The fact that it has become available on the Raspberry Pi has probably brought it slightly more publicity. The Wikipedia article on the ARM does not mention that the ARM cpu and RISC OS were in fact originally created for each other by Acorn Computers Ltd, in Cambridge (UK) in 1988. The Wikipedia article on RISC OS tells the story. RISC OS consists of a small kernel together with Relocatable Modules, which implement the means by which the user, or the user’s software, can interact with the computer.

    Continue reading

    Published on 3 March 2010 by Gavin Wraith

  5. Guardian of the Imperial Inkstand

    Some experiences of using Lua to create and maintain websites for other people. Making a website just for yourself is one matter; doing it for others brings into play a range of quite separate considerations, that affect even the technical matters of design and implementation. You are the pig in the middle, the bacon in the sandwich, sitting between the site on one side and its commissioners on the other.

    Continue reading

    Published on 22 January 2010 by Gavin Wraith

  6. An introduction to Orbit

    Installing Orbit Orbit is a lightweight framework for Web applications written in Lua. Unlike Sputnik, Orbit gives you the basic tools for constructing applications built on WSAPI. If you want authentication, standard look-and-feel, wiki-like functionality, you are better off starting with Sputnik; but Orbit is a satisfying way to build web applications from scratch. The easiest way to install Orbit on a Unix machine is using LuaRocks, but here for a change I will assume that you already have Lua for Windows which already has most of the dependencies for Orbit.

    Continue reading

    Published on 22 December 2009 by Steve Donovan

  7. Sputnik: An Introduction I

    Beyond WikiWiki Sputnik is a second-generation extensible wiki engine written in Lua. First generation wikis (like the original WikiWIki) opened our eyes to the possibility of easy collaborative content generation, with automatic revision control. However, anybody who has been involved with a Wiki knows that they are not self-organizing, and so behind any Wiki is a core of busy elves correcting and ‘refactoring’ content. Plus, all content is usually in the form of marked-up text, plus uploaded binary data like images.

    Continue reading

    Published on 11 November 2009 by Steve Donovan

  8. Lua and the web: an overview

    Lua is among the top 20 most popular programming languages, according to the TIOBE Programming Community index. Lua is also faster and has a smaller memory footprint than other interpreted scripting languages (compare with Ruby, Python, PHP and JavaScript SpiderMonkey). We haven’t heard a lot about Lua on the web, even though there are a number of developers working with Lua on the server-side. Lets take a brief look. The Kepler Project Kepler is a “web development platform” named after astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    Continue reading

    Published on 15 March 2008 by Nathan Youngman

  9. The Golden Wombat of Destiny

    The Golden Wombat of Destiny was a text adventure game (interactive fiction) written by Huw Collingbourne in early `80s. I honestly never got very far in that game, preferring Colossal Cave and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy in the days of the Kaypro IV. Today we’re going to talk about a different wombat, with a different destiny. Spear-headed by Brian McCallister, mod_wombat embeds the Lua programming language into the Apache HTTP server in the same fashion as mod_perl, mod_php and mod_python bring their respective languages into the Apache world of web development.

    Continue reading

    Published on 15 March 2008 by Nathan Youngman

  10. A Computer Scientist, a Mathematician and an Engineer...

    The Lua programming language was developed by three members of Tecgraf, the Computer Graphics Technology Group of PUC-Rio, a University in Rio de Janeiro. Not merely an academic pursuit, it was developed primarily as a replacement for SOL (meaning “sun”) and DEL (data entry language) for Brazilian oil company Petrobras. Lua was started in 1993, near the same time as Matz began working on Ruby. It was designed to be a small and efficient scripting language that could easily be embedded in C/C++ on practically any platform.

    Continue reading

    Published on 10 November 2007 by Nathan Youngman

  11. Launch: getting Lua installed

    To play with Lua you need to download the source code and compile it. This isn’t as scary as it sounds, as Lua is a positively tiny download and doesn’t depend on anything more than a C compiler. Lua is written in standard ANSI C, so any one should work. I will give instructions for Mac OS X, because that’s what I use. Building First, you need to have Apple’s Developer Tools installed.

    Continue reading

    Published on 10 November 2007 by Nathan Youngman

  12. Lua: how we first met

    This past summer I evaluated both Apple Aperture and Adobe Lightroom for managing my digital photographs. You see, iPhoto 6 was getting a bit sluggish, Photoshop Elements even more so (not yet having Intel support). To top it off, I was considering a Digital SLR, so I’d need something that could read RAW. Adobe Lightroom won out for me. It provided enough of the Photoshop functionality (curves, etc.) that I often wouldn’t need to launch Elements.

    Continue reading

    Published on 4 November 2007 by Nathan Youngman

  13. About Lua Nova

    Lua is a light-weight scripting language developed at PUC-Rio in Brazil. “The simplest thing that could possibly work” is the mantra of the Lua founders, and it shows. Originally designed for people who weren’t professional programmers, the syntax is straight-forward with only a few constructs providing quite a lot of power. Lua provides a set of mechanisms to do Self/prototype-like object-oriented programming, as well as many traits of functional programming. I believe it is a good language to learn more about computer programming.

    Continue reading

    Published on 1 November 2007 by Nathan Youngman